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Who's in charge here?
Building Leadership for Transformative Use of Technology
The Association of Independent Maryland Schools (AIMS) presents its
2008 Technology Retreat at Harbourtowne in St. Michaels, Maryland
April 27-29, 2008.


We are considering a meeting of school heads prior to the conference and are also meeting with Ron to discuss the message we want to communicate to school heads. Please add to our Message to Heads page to contribute your thoughts.

We decided to use cliches instead of movie titles as session titles. Please visit the Technology Cliches page to add to this list!

We are starting to brainstorm sessions. Go to the Brainstorming page to add your thoughts.


Keynote Speakers Edit

As we prepared for the 2007 Retreat it become apparent that some speakers book more than a year in advance. As such, we are considering the following for keynote speakers.

Marty recommends Chris Lehmann, the founding principal of Philadelphia's Science Leadership Academy http://www.scienceleadership.org/. There is a great article about the school and Chris Lehmann in the current print issue of Edutopia (http://www.edutopia.org/). Unfortunately, the article about SLA is not on the online version of Edutopia. Here is a bio of Chris Lehmann from the SLA website: Principal: Chris Lehmann -- Chris is the founding principal of the Science Leadership Academy, a progressive science and technology high school in Philadelphia, PA. Chris has returned to his native Philadelphia after nine years as the Technology Coordinator at the Beacon School in New York City, one of the leading urban public schools for technology integration. I have NOT heard him speak.

Articles, etc.Edit

Potential Sessions Edit

Potential topics:


1. Going Green: Environmentally friendly technology practices

Audience: everyone

Facilitators: Steve Rentz

Blurb writer: Susan

How is technology used to assist in your school's conservation efforts? How do you dispose of outdated equipment and software? What power conservation initiatives are in place at your school? Come share your ideas and strategies and learn from others.


2. Rolling-out and training Vista Just on the Vista: Rolling out and training MS Vista

Considering a migration to Windows Vista in the near future? Join those who have already "made the jump" as well as those who are still waiting for the perfect time to migrate. Come hear the successes and challenges faced by schools who are using Vista, and get answers to questions and concerns that are making some schools hesitant to move in that direction.

Audience: everyone Facilitators: Brian Hoyt? Blurb writer: Jeanne


3. LS Issues (panel?)

How do students use technology in the lower school? Should they regularly have scheduled visits to the computer lab or the Carts of tablets/laptops should replace the lab so that students would be able to use technology in a seamless and integrated manner. Should the emphasis be on interdisciplinary projects that students can relate to their own life experiences or should the emphasis also include skill based applications? Furthermore, how are we trying to modify the available technology to fit the needs of these younger students?


Audience: ed techs, lower school

Facilitators: Holly Salb--GDS (she has agreed to do it but will arrive Monday morning so let's put this session in the afternoon), Stacia McFadden--St. Patrick's (she has agreed to do it)

Blurb writer: Roya


4. Getting serious about information literacy


Audience: ed techs, librarians, leadership

Facilitators:

Blurb writer: Marlene

The most generally accepted definition of information literacy is the one developed by the ALA. It says "To be information literate, a person must be able to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate and use effectively the needed information." Research tells us that students who develop these skills will be more successful in their studies and in their life. Are we meeting this criteria and what can we do to ensure that we do?


5. Copyright and fair use

Audience: everyone

Facilitators: Patt Moser

Blurb writer: David W.

Ongoing issues with copyright continue to plague instructors of online services. What are our obligations to copyright holders so that our teachers are comfortable posting assignments and supplemental materials.


6. Libraries 3.0: Future of libraries

Audience: ed techs, librarians, leadership

Facilitators: Marcia Hall

Blurb writer: Marilyn

DRAFT: In medieval libraries, books were so scarce and precious, they were regularly chained to desks and shelves. Today, information needn’t come in book form, nor need students visit the library to get it. As the digital future transforms the landscape of school libraries, how will they remain vital and relevant? Join a conversation about new technologies, digital collections and the changing ways in which students will access information.


7. Open Source Smackdown (panel? John Orban vs.  ?) Throwing away money or time? Microsoft vs. Open Source

Audience: techies, leadership

Facilitators: John Orban vs. Henry Dunning?

Who referees--Bill Pickett?

Blurb writer: Marty

Some school districts, the most notable being Maine Public Schools, are trading in their Microsoft product licenses for open source products such as Open Office and considering open source alternatives to high-priced software products such as Photoshop. Schools are abandoning pricey Blackboard for “free” Moodle. Open Source solutions are available for almost any application, but are they worth the risk? Are budgetary concerns really what’s driving this movement? Are open source programs really “free”? Come share your experience and get some ideas.


8. All Things Google

Audience: ed techs, librarians?

Facilitators: Adrian LaRochelle

Blurb writer: Lynn

How can you use Google Earth in the classroom? Come to this session and learn how to explore the world from your computer using Google Earth. Fly amongst the stars, see planets and galaxies. Find rich multimedia information from the web community and popular sources like National Geographic. Use integrated Google maps and learn about the movement of the planets and the lifecycle of the stars. Participants will also share their use of Google Earth in the classroom.


9. Intro to SecondLife

Audience: ed techs, librarians

Facilitators:

Blurb writer: David W.

Second Life is an Internet-based virtual world which enables its users (Residents) to interact with each other through avatars. Residents can explore, meet other Residents, socialize, participate in individual and group activities, create and trade items (virtual property) and services from one another. ISTE has hosted several virtual meetings in Second Life.


10. Installing and Using the av/it integrated classroom

Audience: everyone?

Facilitators:

Blurb writer: Mike

Technology installation ultimately must keep the needs of the user in mind if technology is to be integrated successfully in the classroom. How do you assure that equipment is not only accessible, but is well used? What strategies and resources reduce risks, maximize efficiency, and promote self-sufficiency for users? Come meet with other IT specialists and technology coordinators to discuss how careful planning can support technology integration.


11. Global education initiatives [1]

How can we better empower our students to cooperate and to utilize themselves in an ever-globalizing society? Can we develop a better understanding of what divides the nations in today’s rapidly changing world by connecting the students to develop an understanding for global issues that affect their everyday lives? How can we use technology to increase the capacity of students to become employable and self-reliant in today’s global marketplace?

Audience: ed techs, librarians

Facilitators: Alecia Berman-Dry, St. John's (has confirmed that she can do it--Roya)

Blurb writer: Roya

12. Faculty technology development plans:

Audience: leadership, ed techs

Facilitators:

Blurb writer: Susan

How important is faculty technology development in your school? What technology development initiatives are in place at your school? Does your school have a formal, funded and ongoing plan or program? How is your Head of School involved in the planning and implementation? Come share and discuss strategies that work!


13. NAIS Principles of Good Practice in Technology Audience: leadership, ed techs, librarians

Facilitators:

Blurb writer: Lynn

The NAIS Principles of Good Practice in Technology offer crucial guidelines for administrators, teachers, and technology staff in planning and managing the role of technology in independent schools. Participants will discuss these principles, as well as the NAIS companion piece “Critical Questions for School Leaders”, which is designed to help school teams discuss, plan, and evaluate technology use in independent schools.


14. Book discussion: Tim Fish, Technology and Leadership

Audience: everyone

Facilitators:

Blurb writer: Marilyn

NAIS published Leadership and Technology at Independent Schools in 2002. Written by Tim Fish, Jamie Britto, and Albert Throckmorton, it remains an important resource for independent school technology leaders. In its three sections: school leadership, technology leadership and academic leadership, the book explores important aspects of organizing, managing and evaluating the technology program in an independent school. Read the book and come to the book discussion prepared to share your impressions and reflections.


15. Major project planning

Audience: everyone

Facilitators: David

Blurb writer: David

Whether you're putting an addition onto your house or installing a new telephone system at your school, it helps to have a plan. But there are plans, and there is project management. We'll discuss the basics of project management and then will work on a couple of case studies. Bring your planning triumphs, disasters, and hard-earned lessons. If you'd like to use one of your projects as a case study, that would be great--just contact the session facilitator.

16. How to use students in your tech program? How much can they handle?

Audience: everyone

Facilitators:

Blurb writer: Mike

Involving students in the development and maintenance of a tech program provides real-world applications that can benefit the students and school community alike. This session will focus on the different issues to consider when building student involvement into the program. Meet with colleagues to discuss best practices. Some issues to consider include; assigning appropriate roles and responsibilities, establishing effective mentorships, and what are the ramifications and issues resulting from student involvement?


17. Setting boundaries? What is "acceptable" technology in a school? Web filtering. Setting Boundaries: How Acceptable is Acceptable Use? How can we find the delicate balance between keeping our sites (and students) secure, while embracing new technologies and moving toward the School 2.0 model of teaching and learning?

Audience: everyone

Facilitators:

Blurb writer: Jeanne


18. Labs vs. 1-1 programs (panel?)

The expectation for technology today is that it becomes increasingly integrated in daily classroom projects, that it extends communication to the home, and that it facilitates anytime, anywhere learning. How is this level of demand on computers and equipment best met in our schools? Is the expense and complexity of a 1-to-1 program the only solution, or are there successful alternatives in the form of laptop carts and/or computer labs?

Audience: everyone

Facilitators: GFS, RPCDS, St. Pauls Girls School, Bryn Mawr ?

Blurb writer: Jenni

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